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Seagrasses are globally deteriorating, with numerous regressions as a results of data fragmentation. Cymodocea nodosa is the most important seagrass in shallow coastal waters of the Canary Islands. No study has so far investigated temporal population trends at the entire archipelago scale. During te last two decades, a prevalence of negative trends was revealed for three seagrass demographic descriptors (seagrass shoot density, coverage and leaf length), evidencing an overall deterioration in seagrass meadow integrity. These results suggest the need to develop correct management strategies to guarantee the conservation of this seagrass and the meadows it creates.Check it out!. Fabbri, F., F. Espino, R. Herrera, L. Moro, R. Haroun, R. Riera, N. González-Henríquez, O. Bergasa, O. Monterroso, M. Ruiz de la Rosa & F. Tuya. 2015. Trends of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa (Magnoliophyta) in the Canary Islands: population changes in the last two decades. Scientia Marina, 79(1): 7-13.

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Global change, as represented by coastal development, pollution, exotic species and climate change, are currently affecting the distribution and abundance of Canarian marine organisms, and pose multiple threats to local species and communities. Environmental risks are significant at community and species levels, particularly for threatened species. Failure to address these trends will result in shifts in local biodiversity with important ecological, social, and economic consequences.Check out:R. Riera, M.A. Becerro, R. Stuart-Smith, J.D. Delgado & G.J. Edgar. 2014. Out of sight, out of mind: threats to the marine biodiversity of the Canary Islands (NE Atlantic Ocean). Marine Pollution Bulletin, 86(1/2): 9-18.

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Ecosystem structure and function greatly differs if seagrass meadows are replaced by green rhizophytic seaweeds (e.g. Caulerpa spp. meadows). These differences were observed through 5 ecological proxies: (i) Primary Production; (ii) Epifauna composition and abundance; (iii) small-sized fishes; (iv) large-sized fishes and (v) Sediment retention. More info: Tuya, F., L. Png-Gonzalez, R. Riera, R. Haroun & F. Espino. 2014. Ecological structure and function differs between habitats dominated by seagrasses and green seaweeds.