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Global change, as represented by coastal development, pollution, exotic species and climate change, are currently affecting the distribution and abundance of Canarian marine organisms, and pose multiple threats to local species and communities. Environmental risks are significant at community and species levels, particularly for threatened species. Failure to address these trends will result in shifts in local biodiversity with important ecological, social, and economic consequences.Check out:R. Riera, M.A. Becerro, R. Stuart-Smith, J.D. Delgado & G.J. Edgar. 2014. Out of sight, out of mind: threats to the marine biodiversity of the Canary Islands (NE Atlantic Ocean). Marine Pollution Bulletin, 86(1/2): 9-18.

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Ecosystem structure and function greatly differs if seagrass meadows are replaced by green rhizophytic seaweeds (e.g. Caulerpa spp. meadows). These differences were observed through 5 ecological proxies: (i) Primary Production; (ii) Epifauna composition and abundance; (iii) small-sized fishes; (iv) large-sized fishes and (v) Sediment retention. More info: Tuya, F., L. Png-Gonzalez, R. Riera, R. Haroun & F. Espino. 2014. Ecological structure and function differs between habitats dominated by seagrasses and green seaweeds.

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A new dorvilleid species belonging to the genus Ophryotrocha is described from circalittoral seabeds (70-100 m) in the Cantabrian Sea (NE Atlantic Ocean). Ophryotrocha cantabrica is characterized by having well developed antennae and palps, parapodia with long dorsal cirrus, as well as, P-type maxillae and bifid mandibles slightly tagged. The most closely related species are O. longidentata and O. lobifera. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8966156